Category: words to know

victoriousvocabulary: ATARAXIA [noun] a Greek …

victoriousvocabulary:

ATARAXIA

[noun]

a Greek term used by Pyrrho and Epicurus for a lucid state, characterised by freedom from worry or any other preoccupation; a state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquillity; serenity.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek ἀταραξία (ataraksía), – (a-), “negative prefix” + ταράσσω (tarássō), “trouble, disturb”.

[RHADS – Holiday]

victoriousvocabulary: APRICATE [adjective] to …

victoriousvocabulary:

APRICATE

[adjective]

to bask in the sun; to lie in or be exposed to a pleasant warmth generated by the sun.

Etymology: “to bask in the sun,” from Latin apricatus, past participle of apricari, “to bask in the sun,” from apricus, “exposed” (to the sun); perhaps contracted from *apericus, from aperire, “to open.”

[Oliver Hibert – Morgan Delt: Phase Zero Album Art] [animated version]

amandaonwriting:

amandaonwriting:

Words

victoriousvocabulary: BICEPHALY [aka DICEPHALY…

victoriousvocabulary:

BICEPHALY [aka DICEPHALY]

[noun]

the condition of having two heads.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek dis, “twice” or from Latin bis “twice” + Greek kephalḗ, “head”.

[Robin Eisenberg – Raspberry Beret]

What is verbal diarrhoea?

What is verbal diarrhoea?

1) Careless (or casual) statements.

2) Writing (or talking) a lot and then not editing the result properly.

I think most writers have had that conundrum where they don’t know how descriptive they ought to get and/or how they should introduce a situation or character trait.

For example you could say “Theo has insomnia” or throughout your story you could consistently point out how Theo has trouble sleeping and allow the reader to figure it out for themselves that Theo’s an insomniac.

Hope that makes sense.

victoriousvocabulary: HEART-WHOLE [adjective]…

victoriousvocabulary:

HEART-WHOLE

[adjective]

1. not in love.

2. wholehearted; sincere.

3. stout-hearted.

4. with unconditional and enthusiastic devotion.

Etymology: from Middle
English herte, from Old English heorte, “heart”, from Proto-Germanic *hertô, “heart”, from Proto-Indo-European
*ḱḗr, “heart”.

[Tobe Fonseca]

victoriousvocabulary: UNDIGENOUS [adjective] …

victoriousvocabulary:

UNDIGENOUS

[adjective]

created or generated by water.

Etymology: from New Latin undina, from Latin unda, “a wave” + Greek –genous, “yield or generating”, ultimately from –genēs,“born”.

[Christian Schloe – Water Garden]

victoriousvocabulary: HYPAETHRAL [adjective] 1…

victoriousvocabulary:

HYPAETHRAL

[adjective]

1. wholly or partly open to the sky.

2. not closed in our surrounded or included.

3. Architecture: having no roof.

Etymology: from Latin hypaethrus, “uncovered”, from Greek hupaithros, from hupo-, “under” + aithros, “clear sky”.

[Patrick Kramer / motion by v]

victoriousvocabulary: FRANGIBLE [adjective] ea…

victoriousvocabulary:

FRANGIBLE

[adjective]

easily broken; breakable; delicate; brittle.

Etymology: from Old French, ultimately from Latin frangere, “to break”.

[image source]

victoriousvocabulary: OROGRAPHY  [noun]  the b…

victoriousvocabulary:

OROGRAPHY 

[noun] 

the branch of physical geography dealing with mountains. 

Etymology: from Greek óros, “mountain” + graphein, “to write”.

[Nicole Gustafsson – Island Mountain]